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Jason Roy wants to propel England into tri-series final

  • England face New Zealand on the back of two T20 defeats by rivals Australia
  • In Hobart and Melbourne, England’s bowlers were left defending slender scores
  • Opening batsman Jason Roy says England are keen to right their recent wrongs 

Paul Newman for MailOnline

Jason Roy went into the must-win Twenty20 international here against New Zealand determined to remember this tri-series for more than being denied the catch that cost England a victory against Australia.

Roy was convinced he had safely pouched Glenn Maxwell at a pivotal stage of his match-winning century in Hobart only to be denied by the unsatisfactory two-dimensional television images that always provide doubt.

Now the Surrey opener wants to relocate the form that saw him score a record-breaking 180 in the 50-over series opener in Melbourne to give England the victory they desperately need to stay in contention for the final.

Jason Roy wants to propel England into the tri-series final against New Zealand

Jason Roy wants to propel England into the tri-series final against New Zealand

Jason Roy wants to propel England into the tri-series final against New Zealand

The Surrey and England opener practises ahead of their clash with New Zealand in Wellington

The Surrey and England opener practises ahead of their clash with New Zealand in Wellington

The Surrey and England opener practises ahead of their clash with New Zealand in Wellington

‘I guess you get upset when your word is not taken over catches like that because the slow motion looks a bit more against you than it probably is,’ said Roy, who remains adamant the catch at long-off was clean.

‘I was pretty certain I had my fingers under the ball but that’s just how it goes. I was more frustrated with myself that I didn’t make the ground because it was a sitter. I should have just run in and caught it chest high pretty much.’

Roy was frustrated that the decision had to be made by technology. ‘You’d like to think a fielder’s word would be taken but that’s what the soft signal is for,’ he said. ‘The umpire took my word it was out and gave the soft signal as out but technology suggested otherwise. More often that not it’s usually correct.

‘It didn’t look great at all on the big screen and that’s why I got a bit annoyed because it felt fine when I caught it and everything felt good. But clearly it looked very dubious in replays and the crowd behind me let me know that as well!’

England’s mission at the Westpac Stadium and in Hamilton on Sunday is to defeat New Zealand twice and show they can be just as good in the Twenty20 game as they have been in 50-over cricket since last they were here. On that occasion a World Cup thrashing in Wellington epitomised everything that was wrong with England’s old-fashioned limited-overs tactics.

England lost twice to Australia, with bowlers left defending slender scores of 155 and 137

England lost twice to Australia, with bowlers left defending slender scores of 155 and 137

England lost twice to Australia, with bowlers left defending slender scores of 155 and 137

‘Twenty20 is a rhythm thing,’ said Roy. ‘We’ve come off the back of Test series and one-day series and it’s been quite a quick transition. A T20 game requires skills that a lot of the players are still trying to develop.

‘We don’t play a huge amount of international Twenty20s and the boys haven’t played an awful lot of this game over the last few months so we’ve got to work out why we’re slow in locating the rhythm needed for the shorter game.

‘I didn’t think I’d cracked it when I scored 180 in Melbourne, I just felt I was in a great place with my batting and I still do. T20s are a completely different kettle of fish, they need a different technique and a different mind-set. I feel like in 50-over cricket things are running pretty well and my movements are good. That’s what I need to replicate in Twenty20 cricket.’

 


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